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>>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it
tech companies in the world are teeming up against the national security agency. they all want to limit the federal government from collecting their user information. the companies want more oversight and accountability from organizations like the nsa. we have more in washington and what steps are these companies taking against the nsa? >> reporter: well, for the moment we have this open letter that was published in several newspapers and the elusive agency of several principles that should governor future surveillance by the u.s. government. at the core of those principles is an end to the mass bulk data collection of national security agency. what we learned over the last few months from whistle blower edward snowdon is the nsa is hoovering up vast quantities of information whether you're an american citizen or not and storing it. they say that has to stop. they also say that what is needed is more oversight legal framework. they're getting worried. they fear the more we learn about the u.s. government's surveillance for americans and non-americans, but the lesser we trust american in
by the national security agency is tracked around the world. according to the location, they have cell phones to look for behavior among terror suspects. >>> and 2 million facebook twitter and yahoo users have had their passwords stolen. they have been sending them to a server controlled by hackers. this mall wear keeps a record of everything they type into their users. >> they find everything you have ever sent. >> they say one of the biggest problems and mistakes people make is using the same passwords and that's why many are forcing people to come up with a more complex pass password. >>> the radioactive cobalt used in a hospital was on its way to a nuclear waste site when used thieves knew what was in the truck. now the truck has been recovered along with the radioactivity. many who have come in contact of the radioactivity can die with in days. >>> this is a possible kidnapping attempt. now they are hoping somebody will recognize the man and woman seen in the video and come forward with information. it happened at 6:00 tuesday night and the driver saw a man and woman fighting over a bag
, demanding strict new curbs on government surveillance. the national security agency checked far more user data than the companies realize. i am joined by a national technology reporter for the washington post. are the tech companies here motivated by principle or profit? >> i am guessing both. nobody likes having their stuff stolen, and that is what has happened here. it is bad business for users to think their information is going to be stolen if they give it to google or yahoo. they knew they were giving information to the u.s. government under court order. but the extent has taken this them by shock. data was selected from fiber on particular cables over southeast. >> what about the chance of a new law being passed? >> hard to know where this is going. the u.s. congress is not known for its efficiency. this has gotten the world's attention. i think the shape is early to tell, but i wouldn't be surprised to see some kind of act. >> doesn't the government have a case when it cease it needs all this information to protect national security. >> sure. if my job was to prevent titleist attac
phones are being monitored by the national security agency. that's according to a "the washington post" according to edward snowden. the spy agency says it does not collect data from phones in the u.s. >> the rescuers are holding out little hope for whales stranded in the ever glades. 4 dozen short-finned pilot whales swam into the shallows. six died. vets youthanized four more. a wealthy neighbourhood in louisiana wants to form its own city. we have more from baton rouge. >> jeffrey lee doesn't miss a moment with his grandchildren at baton rouge. >> they are not in school, but he knows education will be the key to a better life. >> i want them to go to school and learn what they can. >> it's a challenge in a city where 60% of the students are not learning at grade level. >> it's one of the worst school systems. how many generations of children do you disserve before you try sag different. >> lionel rainy is part of a group pushing for a different plan. the city of st george would encompass an area home to a quarter of the residents. if would control and run its own schools with tax re
.s. national security agencies is gathering billions of records from mobile phones around the world. that's according to leaked top secret documents given to the washington post by whistleblower edward snowden. it is said to track the movement of people in ways previously unimaginable. they use code traveller to map relationships and movements. american oticials say what they said was legal and reports were used on what they call foreign targets. civil rights campaigner say it's a breach of privacy. >> you are walking along minding your business thinking you'd never be of interest. if you have one of these there's every possibility that they are tracking where you've been and who you were speaking to. according to new documents, it's revealed that the american spy agency is somewhere snt region of the 5 billion pieces of information. here is how it works. you identified as an intelligence target. it's sending out signals as you are walking around. it can work out where you've been and who you've been speaking to. and if they also have a mobile phone. when you go online you may be able to
locations overseas including those of americans. the "washington post" says that the national security agency unintentionally gathers all of the reports when it taps into world wide mobile network cables. n.s.a. leaker edward snowden gave documents to the "washington post" that detail the tracking program. the government has declined to comment but in the past has said it does not gather data on cell phones in the united states. >> police are wanting residents of a jump in mail theft. a property tax check was stolen from a pale box on the curve. to avoid becoming a victim of check fraud or identity theft, use the big blue mailboxes at the post office especially when you send payments for bills. >> treatment police hope you recognize this man and help capture him. detectives posted this surveillance video on youtube showing the man going through a drawer in a home break in. police have not revealed what was taken, but it happened around 12:30 on saturday afternoon. >> san jose police are looking for stolen officers' badge after someone break interest a personal car of an officer and too
at the national security agency are not just intercepting calls but also tracking the movements of phones around the world. the paper cites documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. it says agents collect 5 billion records every day on cell phones across the planet. the report says agents use that information to track people of interest and identify their associates. u.s. government officials say nsa personnel are trying to prevent terrorism and only monitoring non-americans. >>> the pris tij ous hotel in prag has turned a secret cold war underground bunker into a tourist destination. the aim is to show visitors how it was once used as a center for spy operations. the alta hotel recently opened the bunker to mark its 55th anniversary. during the cold war the luxury hotel was a popular destination for both western tourists and journalists. hidden 20 meters under ground it can only be reached by ladder. a hotel official says only a few knew it ever existed. on display is some original spy equipment such as a tape recorder for listening on each of the hotel's 94 rooms, also a floor
six months since ed snowden revealed the effort ops the national security agency phones' now congressman roger is investigating whether ed snowden was working alone or whether other governments may have played a role. catherine herridge is in washington. other governments to whom is he referring here? >> if you take a close review of the nasa nasa -- national security agency leaked documents they talk about the works overseas, and the chairman of the house intelligence committee, who gets regular brief examination -- briefings, says there is now evidence suggesting edward snowden had helped when he downloaded 200,000 documents. >> we know he did some things capability wise that were beyond his capabilities, meaning he used someone else's help to steal things from the people of the united states, classified information, information we use to keep america safe. >> and the former head of the nsa and said that his activities have permanently damaged u.s. security. >> it's very, very hard. this is the -- this is catastrophic for the safety and security of the american nation. what
extensive the national security agency really is. they have spent years spying on online gamers, including those playing on world of workout. in obamacare architect ezekiel emanuel says people haven't signed up for coverage because the obama administration has not sufficiently promoted it. my next guest says he couldn't write a greater piece of fiction in the obamacare narrative. we are joined now by best-selling author in his latest book. i was going to make a remark about a number of things. i will constrain myself. ezekiel emanuel, saying if you really want to keep your doctor, the obama deal is just to pay up. >> so what is he telling us? in obamacare works if you're rich. so if you're rich, you get to have choices and we heard that certain high and technologically advanced hospitals are being dropped off of all these insurance plans. and again, don't get access to the doctor you wanted the best health care system you can possibly have unless you are rich and that is the bottom line, which is a stunner coming from the high progressives to. >> the idea, that these hospitals would be exc
. the details come from edward snowden, who leaked a trove of material from the national security agency last summer. intelligence officials maintain the data collection operation has thwarted a number of terror attacks. a presidential advisory panel has been reviewing the issue. its findings could come this week. we hear now from the tech world. brad smith is the general counsel and an executive vice president of microsoft. he's also speaking on behalf of the companies that signed today's letter. >> brad smith, welcome to the program. what is it that the government is doing that microsoft and the other companies want them to stop? well, throughout our industry we're concerned about the increasing reports that government surveillance including in the u.s. but also elsewhere has gone beyond what people understood. we see a need for reform. and specifically we're hoping that there will be clear legal rules, all of this should take place pursuant to the law there should be stronger executive oversight there needs to be enhanced review by the courts. and there needs to be a bit more transparency,
operation by the national security agency while us president barack obama and twenty five other foreign heads of government or on canadian soil in june of two thousand ten hundred us operation was no secrets to canadian authorities. so can the canadian authorities not only knew about the find was going on in our country but they may have even participated in it and has privacy advocates crying foul earlier by steve anderson executive director of open media for more on this latest docu shock when first asked whether we should never feel like the cry is about these latest disclosures. well we already know a thing. really surprising that most canadians. we're a go it would only allow a foreign spy agency to spy on our soil actually go and our country said its operations and one in three people. as a stronger candidate in the g twenty. i think that he's impressed many came. it surprised me. even though the revelations. i can stay on for the update until you know in my reading chair. it was a the sta many others. i'm really not expect it to all of us and stay inspired. people in canada as to
are not confidential. the washington post is reporting the national security agency tracks the location of nearly 5 billion cell phone calls daily. the post found out about the program in documents provided by former nsa analyst edward snowden. >> the los angeles county coroner's office said today that an autopsy on the body of actor paul walker found that he died of traumatic injuries and burns in that car crash saturday. his friend be roger rodas who was driving the porsche died of traumatic injuries. they are not sure what caused the crash, but speed was a factor. >> some crosswalks in downtown baltimore are being painted to look like hopscotch boards. another design is painted to look like a giant zipper. >>> some young ballerinas planning an annual holiday performance being upstaged by the president. >> a last minute scheduling conflict at american university forced a local ballet company out of the theater to make room for a network interview with president barack obama. >> an interview with the president of the united states doesn't happen every day. >> but a performance for the nutcracker d
the documents that were leaked by edward snowden. the national security agency tracked the locations of up to 5 billion overseas cell phone calls, including those belonging to americans. the tracking picks up the names of the people the users are calling. it does not gather data on american cell phones inside the u.s. >>> president obama is wading into the minimum wage debate, as it grabs a spotlight today in cities coast-to-coast. president obama cled on congress to increase the federal minimum wage. he pressed for an extension to jobless benefits to over a million long-term unemployed people. they expire three days after christmas. >>> meantime, fast food workers across the country will have their say today. they're staging another round of walkouts for higher pay. among the demands, a $15 an hour minimum wage and the right to unionize. experts say such a pay increase could push up fast food costs by about 20%. put another way, the cost of a $3 hamburger could rise to around $3.50. >>> universal pictures is shutting down production on "fast & furious 7," to figure out how to proceed with the
been the envy of america's national security agency the sites according to investigative journalist duncan campbell i'm sweet and always have allowed recruitment intelligence relationship with food waste during the years the cold war i'm a fiend tend to secretly in. to the club hosts the big spots in which they all thought this would be nice to get to that prime minister in return for betraying the tennessean secure a whole austin ate those and many of their own citizens. sweden was the largest collaborate to europe with the internet typing program run by the fine arts group of english speaking countries um and it said it does so because of its direct access the cables to the baltic and it's no surprise that the chp and nsa would want that as well as everything else is that they can take from st despite the criticism some governments protect their spine programs is something essential day this week the editor of britain's got the new sky to face questioning by and pains he believes that the publishing it's nice that the nation's put a dent in national security. jenna's claim eighty
. the letter follows information leaked by former national security agency contract for edward snowden, who leaked details of the secret programs. >> the nation's largest gay rights group says that corporate support for gay and trans and gender workers is reaching new course in the country. the a human- rights campaigner, but more than two-thirds of fortune 500 companies and 90% all the large employers its survey are not offering spousal benefits to the same sex the domestic partners. the group's 12th and will corporate quality index also found a record number of business is adopting the policy prohibiting discrimination against trans gender workers in job applications. >> the merger of american airlines and u.s. air ways has formed an air travel giant larger than the current industry leader, denied continental holdings. the new company will be called american airlines. passengers likely will not see this merger e. neely. ticketing and frequent flyer programs are expected to be combined. >> watching gas prices this morning. and the average price for a gallon of regular gasoline is up 3¢. a
his game time, kudos to you, surveillance nerve. it says national security agency world of war craft, tony. >> thank you have a, shutting down the country arps main state news agency, the new agency will promote russia's image around the world. heading all of this, someone who is openly 18th gay. peter sharp the reports from moscow. >> this isn't just any news agency, it's one of the biggest in the world. it's got bureaus in 30 countries. one of the main sponsors of the sochi facilities. so was this expected? well, not according to local journalists at the organization. first they knew was when the news came on the kremlin's website and a man chosen to run the organization, that's dimitri krisiliof, he is a well-known anchor, talk show host, often venomous comments, very antigay, very antiopposition, very antiamerican. and his appointment will be seen basically i think as a further example of putin and the kremlin putting pressure on a very already heavily regulated media. >> cancer researchers release stunning results in the fight against leukemia. saturday the university of pennsyl
snooping. according to the washington post the u -s national security agency was intercepting traffic inside google's and yahoo's private networks. and microsoft fears that the n- s -a may have broken into their global communications as well. microsoft plans to encrypt data flowing through all of its communication, productivity services. google and yahoo have announced that they will also move forward with encryption initiatives. a frosty morning. president barack obama is defending the national security agency saying it does a very good job of not engaging in domestic surveillance. that was his response to a recent report that the agency tracks locations of nearly 5 billion cellphone every day overseas including those of americans. the president says he will propose " some self restraint " on the agency after a panel of hand-picked advisers reports back this month. he also says the nsa isn't interested in reading people's image and text messages. stanley roberts who found some people behaving badly. drivers and bicyclist have to share the road. that is an undisputed fact grid and if
government snooping according to the washington post, the u.s. national security agency was intercepting traffic inside kugels and yahoos private networks. --google's. and microsoft fears that the nsa may have broken into their global communications as well. microsoft plans to encrypt data flowing through all of its communication, productive and the services. google. and yahoo have announced they will also move forward with encryption initiatives. >>darya: starbucks is selling its limited edition $450 gift cards. and they are expected to go fast. these cards are metal every loaded with $400 a enough money to keep decaffeinated coffee year long. however, there is a catch, you can't get these cards and stores. you can only buy them on the flash still website gilt.com. they're also expected to be an even higher demand a share because these are your cards to buy. -there are fewer cards to buy. the company is only selling 8000 parts instead of the 5000 cards it offered last year. the cards go on sale today at noon. last year the cars sold out and about six minutes. >>james: and this year into
." the letter follow revelations by former national security agency contractor edward snowden, who leaked details of the secret programs that critics say violate privacy rights >> i will highlight more of the weather when we return. >> ice, snow, and cold weather are causing problems all over the country. in addition to stranding numerous drivers and causing thousands of flight cancellations, andrew spencer reports the wintry storms are causing damage. >> it looks like an onion lucky place for you to have parked your car. it did not happen just once, rooftops were so heavy that have allegis failed to the street. take a look at some of the damage. the interstate was shut down does not see snow especially not like this. many drivers in little rock, ark. are used to the ice conditions. >> the residential areas are not clear. >> take a look at this the view from this error plane. across the country the weather cost thousands of flights to be canceled. so many people were stuck in dallas that they started to provide food for them. even the white house and the capital got a little bit of a dust
be under surveillancy the n.s.a. they said the national security agency is tracking 5 billion cell phones every day. the paper cited documents from edward snowden. it means the spy agency could track the movement of almost any cell phone around the world. n.s.a. officials refused to comment, but said they don't collect data on sell phones in the united states. >>> tonight a new meningitis outbreak at the university of california, santa barbara o initials are racing to stop the bacteria spreading. brian rooney has more. >> four students at this cancer developed a rare form of meningitis in three weeks. one in four who catch it dee. 20% suffer permanent damage. >> when the outbreak started, when we had three cases two weeks ago, three cases in two weeks was a dangerous situation. >> a student, a freshman la cross player had such a serious case that both his feet had to be amputated. >> once it causes bloodpoichg, sepsis can be so overwelcoming, the body is tox. >>, and hand and feet are overwhelmed with infection andar amputated. >> students you warned to avoid close contact, sharing drinks
. >> the u.s. national security agency is gathering billions of records from mobile phones worldwide according to leaked top secret documents given to the paper by former edward snowden. the report says 5 bill yop records every 24 hours allows u.s. intelligence officials to track the movement of people in ways that were unimaginable. using tools such as code traveller, which can map relationships geographically with people and their most. american people say it is legal. it's a breach of privacy. let's discuss it with the ceo of spark digital, a digital marketing and social media company. to know the n.s.a. is spying on people using their mobile phones, sure that is no surprise. what is interesting about that to you. >> what is interesting is what they are tracking. date, time, speed, trajectory. that's what they are keeping historical records of. what is a lot of people don't know is they are not just looking at it just at this moment, but backwards in time when the phone came online. >> code traveller, meaning they can work out which group of people from in proximity to each other.
's the number of cell phone records the national security agency is reportedly collecting every day. that's five billion per day with a b. top secret do you means leaked by edward snowden reportedly show that they contract individuals and map their relationships. the agency said they collect data incidentally and not deliberately. next number, $5,000, actually it's $5,000 and a car is the amount rob ford reportedly offered a drug dealer in exchange for a potentially incriminating video that showed the mayor smoke smoking crack. the dealer refused to sell the video and wanted to hold on to the insurance policy. three is the number of times dennis rodman will have traveled to north korea. he announced he planned to go back on december 18th. he is training the north korean basketball team for a match. we say game in america. a game in january. rodman developed a close friendship with the dictator kim jung un. 28 inches is how much snow has been dropped in the last 24 hours in part parts of the midwest. two harbors. minnesota got slammed. that's a town there. schools are closed and roads are impassi
the u.s. national security agency is collecting billions of records of mobile phone locations from around the world every day. it is provided by edward snowden. we explain how a horrible phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network at the closest tower. when it does, your phone number is logged by the network, along with the tower you connected to, which means your location. if you're on the move, anyone with access to this information can track your route. the latest revelations suggest the n.s.a. is doing much more than just tracking individual suspects. by gathering and processing around 5 billion records each day, it is able to see which individuals are meeting or tracking together. >> you might be connected to a tower along with 100 other people. you move down the street and automatically you, fuel find connects to the next closest tower. let's say 20 of the 100 are moving the same direction you. move further down the road and say just five of the original 100
.s. national security agency is directing billions of records of mobile phone locations every day. how a mobile phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network. usually through the closest tower. as soon as it does, your phone number is logged with the network, along with which tower you have connected to. which means your location. >> if you are on the move, anyone with tract your rout. by gathering and processing 5 billion records each day, to see which individuals are traveling or meeting together. here is how it works. >> you may be connected to a tower, along with 100 other people. you move down the street, and automatically connects to the next closest tower. say 20 of the 100 are moving in the same direction you move further down the road, and say just five of the original 100 people, join you. a couple more towers and some time later just one person who is mirrored your movements. the assumption, you have some reason for being together. >> it raise as lot of question. it c
security agency tracking cell phone locations gathering 5 billion records a day. evidently americans' cell phones overseas aren't being repd. more from edward snowden. joining me justice correspondent pete williams. pete, this is collecting data. then if they want to they can do back and see where your cell phone was used. is that basically -- they are not tracking us overseas in realtime when we use our cell phones? >> the term "tracking" used to describe is something of a misnomer, it's not realtime. it's storing the record of where the cell phone was when the call was made. as you say, this was outside united states. the nsa does this the capability to gather data inside but it has not, chosen not to do it but it does track it outside the u.s. it's part of what is in the database of phone calls. go back and try to reconstruct where someone was or try to develop relationships, see who was in a certain place where maybe something bad happened, who was around a person the time the call was made, that data. they say it's valuable to gather information on suspected terror cells overseas. as
the national security agency basically patrolling all the cell phones in the world basically. a lot of young people point to privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more like seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom. by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, they spend so much time texting and instagrami instagraming. something is coming up every single day. and so all of us spend more and more of our lives in cyberspace. now, the challenge is, first of all, we do have people trying to hurt us. and they communicate through these same systems. if we're going to do a good job preventing a terror attack, a weapon of mass destruction getting on to the new york subway system, et cetera
phone with their permission on a special app. new reports say the national security agency is running a massive program to track the location of hundreds of millions of cell phones around the world. the nsa collects nearly 5 billion location records a day, almost 58,000 records of call information and other data per expect second. the nsa does it, the post reports, to find unknown associates of people it's targeting for surveillance. >> let's say they're interested in tracking somebody here by the red dot. as that person moves around a path, a certain number of people are going to be following the same general direction. as they move, fewer and fewer people are going down the same exact path. and say fewer people are there and by the time they get to one other location, there's only one person who has been travelng the same path, the green dot right there. >> and they can track when two people arrive at the same location from different directions more than once. cell phones are always emitting location signals, even when you're not making calls and even when your phone is not turned o
to restrict the surveillance by the national security agency? >> i would like to apply the fourth amendment to third party records. so when i have a contract with a phone company, i think those are still my records and you can look at them if you're from the government if you ask a judge. a warrant applies to one person. not to everyone in america. it's absolutely against the spirit and the letter of the fourth amendment to say that a judge can write one warrant and you can get every phone call in america and that's what's happening. i think it's wrong. it goes against everything america stands for and i will help to fight that all the way to the support. we need to get the supreme court to re-examine our records. >> so, you would ban if you could, all mass data mining. >> i'm for going after terrorists with every tool we have. i'm not opposed to the nsa, to spying, but i am infavor of the fourth amendment. if you think someone's a terrorist, you call a judge, get a warrant. if that's person's called 100 people, you get 100 more warrants. if they've called 10,000 people, you've got to get 1
. >> the more we learn about the scale of the national security agency stages, the less likely we're to trust them. they are calling for the end of bulk data collection, after hoovering up of our international usage, around also more transparency and accountability in the process of surveillance. and it's not just e-mails and general web data but is being surveyed according to the latest observation from edward snowden, game players are being targeted. x box live a virtual gaming network, is being infiltrated by spies, so many spies that huge procedures are worked out to prevent spice from spying on each other. >>> russia's president has issued a surprise decree shutting down the country's main states news agency. let's go back to felicity in london for more. >> yes, folly, vladimir putin is opening a new news agency, headed by the ultraconservative news executive. peter sharp has more from moscow. >> this isn't any ordinary news organization, this is one of the biggest news agencies in the world. it's got bureaus in more than 30 countries. it's one of the main sponsors for the winter olympic
stuki showed this image national security agency world of war craft. >> oh my goodness. appreciate it, thank you. >>> let's see on wall street stocks are slightly higher at the close. the dow edging up almost 6 points, the s&p 500 hitting a new record high. investors are waiting for new clues we are told about whether the federal reserve will start winding down its massive economic stimulus program. >>> there is a new airline in the skies today. american airlines and u.s. air completed their merger forming the largest air carrier. four airlines now cover 80% of u.s. air flights. >>> gas prices are up. the lundberg survey says the price per gallon rose 3 cents in the last two weeks, average for regular is $3.29. jeremy is a financial writer with zacks investment service. >> pleasure, man. >> american airlines and u.s. airways have locked up this merger. what's it going to mean jarrod for flying public for you for me for all of us? >> as a pilot myself i'm pretty close to the industry and i obviously travel quite a bit. i spent last year traveling just weekly. what's interesting is when
sense. from td ameritrade. >>> is the national security agency infiltrating video games? documents released by former nsa contractor edward snowden she in 2008, the agency planted sleeper agents inside games like world of war craft and second life, amid concerns that those games could be used by terror groups to coordinate attacks. the documents were published today. i talked to spencer ackerman, u.s. national security editor at the guardian which was one of those who broke the story, and i asked him how a game like world of war craft could possibly be a hotbed for terrorist activity. >> world of war craft, like many other really popular addictive, immersive individual yvideo gam deeply, deeply richly developed fantasy game in which you go on quests along with your virtual friends and face things like weird creatures and other things that i don't know about because of course i would never play these types of games. no, never. >> would a terrorist group use such a game to launch an attack? >> well, that's kind of unclear, but the suspicion around the late 2,000s was that as more of
of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. >>> the super secret national security agency actively monitoring hundreds of millions of cell phones around the world. that, according to today's "the washington post" based on top secret documents divulged by edward snowden. they reveal the spy agency's gathering 5 billion cell phone records every 24 hours. brian todd is looking into the story. cell phones belonging to american as well, are they part of this? >> inadvertently, yes. the nsa, as you no, not allowed to spy on americans and senior u.s. intelligence official tells evan peres the location program, the one reported on, is focused on foreign targets. and the nsa says it does not intentionally target american but was the whereabouts the phones of some americans overseas and some in the u.s. could be collected inadvertently in these operations. a senior u.s. official tells perez they try to minimize that when an innocent american's cell phone's location is collected they try remove that from the database as soon as collected. they're trying to minimize and avoid targetin
, the national security agency, top administration officials are now talking about splitting off control of the cyber warfare command, which is now controlled jointly by the head of the nsa, to make those two separate jobs because they say to give them both to the nsa director gives too much power to one man. what do you think of that idea? >> i actually think the idea is good, but not for the reasons the administration has put forward. this is not about the concentration of power. this is about the overburdening of responsibility. i was the director of nsa. i thought it was actually a full-time day work. i don't know you can be the drmsa , as we called him, and a four-star combatant commander. so again, it's not about the overconcentration of power. it's just that the responsibilities have grown too great. >> and intelligence officials are now talking about their real concern that nsa leaker edward snowden may have put together something that's been called a doomsday cache of top secret documents, much more damaging than anything he's released so far, and that they will be released if a
. and the "washington post" reported the national security agency collects roughly five billion records a day on the location of cell phones worldwide, based on documents leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. >> woodruff: on the "newshour" online right now, archaeologists have discovered that we're all mutts. new tests on the oldest-known human d.n.a. reveal that homo sapiens have more ancestors than we had previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie calle
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
the story about the national security agency basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically. a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments for people signing up, they want to keep their privacy. >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare, people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issues a broader issue. young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and so i am. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming. >> whatever. >> something's coming up every single day. so all of us spend more and more of o
're trying to eliminate. >> when you saw the story about the national security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like to be part of anything collecting information. health care, is this going to be one of the detriments to people signing up, they want to keep their privacy? >> health care is entirely different. it's similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government, it's protected, it's governed by a whole series of law. nsa is a broader issue and, you're right, young people are rightly sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and to maintain internet freedom and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights and expectations in this country but it's particularly something that young people care about because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and, you know -- >> whatever. >> something is coming up ever
security agency, basically patrolling all of the cell phones in the world, basically, a lot of young people point to the privacy requirements. they don't like being part of anything that's collecting information. health care. is this going to be one of the detriments to people wanting to sign up? they want to keep their privacy? >> first of all, health care is entirely different. it's more similar to seniors who sign up for medicare or people who file their taxes. you know, there are a whole bunch of things where you're providing information to the government. it's protected. it's governed by a whole series of laws. the nsa issue is a broader issue. you're right. young people rightly are sensitive to the needs to preserve their privacy and maintain internet freedom. and, by the way, so am i. that's part of not just our first amendment rights, and expectations in this country, but it's particularly something that young people care about, because they spend so much time texting and, you know, instagraming and -- vining. there's -- something is coming up every single day. so all of us spend mo
they understand the need for the national security agency to protect american citizens, they think the snooping has gone too far. plus, of course, it's bad for business. the companies have been getting hammered with consumer complaints ever since leaked documents revealed the extent to which the nsa tracks internet and cell phone communications. according to the "washington post" the latest document dump showed the agency collects about five billion cell phone records a day. >>> coming up on "the lead," take football and snow, lots of snow, mix in a dash of lesean mccoy, what do you get? well, dare i say perfection. highlights from the craziest sunday in recent memory, next. and it feels like your lifeate revolves around your symptoms, ask your gastroenterologist about humira adalimumab. humira has been proven to work for adults who have tried other medications but still experience the symptoms of moderate to severe crohn's disease. in clinical studies, the majority of patients on humira saw significant symptom relief, and many achieved remission. humira can lower your ability to fight infectio
intelligence agency lt. gen. michael flynn on national security. in a little more than an hour we will riata washington journal special on the national institutes of health. now, the head of the defense intelligence agency, lt. gen. michael flynn con challenges facing the intelligence community kind of unlimited resources and cyber threats. his comments at the institute of world politics are a little more than an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. my name is john. i am president of the institute. for those of you are new to the institute of world politics, i would like to just introduce us and our mission. we are independent graduate school on national security and international affairs. we specialize in teaching all of the different arts of statecraft by which we mean the various instruments of national power, military strategy, intelligence, counterintelligence, diplomacy, the many arts and public diplomacy and sought power such as culture of a policy, information policy, political action, and that sort of thing. economic strategy and now all of these
commerce, national security agency, this is never happening. >> security implications of this challenging. with respect to security, there are requirements for checking out the background of persons who operate these vehicles, delivery systems in addition to delivering the 9 packages to your front door they could deliver small weapons benign pa your front door they could deliver small weapons systems. this will be challenge dennis: getting a lot of pr out of this. thanks for being with us. cheryl: after a terrible date have you ever wanted to warn other women or men about going out with zak person? now there is an apps for doing that. we should explain what this is, just for women. >> an application that is wildly popular that allows women to rate men and not only raid them but on a 1-10 scale. the issue is there are privacy concerns, reputation concerns. i talked to the lulu ceo about a lot of these, what the numbers are behind it. >> we are just focusing, we are very young so we are focused on building the best possible experience moving into new verticals, new markets and trying to rea
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